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For thirteen days, from February 23 - March 6, 1936, the Mexican army under the command of President General Antonio López de Santa Anna laid siege to Texians defending the mission known as the Alamo mission at San Antonio de Béxar (now San Antonio, Texas). Approximately 1,500 Mexican troops assaulted the mission as the first step in a campaign to re-take Texas. The two armies engaged in several skirmishes with minimal casualties. Aware that his garrison could not withstand an attack by such a large force, Travis wrote multiple letters pleading for more men and supplies, but few reinforcements arrived. In the early morning hours of March 6, the Mexican Army advanced on the Alamo in earnest. A massacre ensued - most Texians died while fighting, including William Travis, Jim Bowie and Davy Crockett, but the few defenders who were captured or surrendered were summarily executed. Reports vary, but somewhere between 200-250 Texians died that day, and 400-600 Mexican soldiers were killed or wounded. Afterwards, the bodies of the Alamo defenders were looted, dismembered, buried in mass graves, dumped into the river, or burned. General Santa Anna's reported cruelty during the battle was supposed to instill fear in other Texians, but instead, it gave them a fire for revenge. The Texians defeated the Mexican Army at the Battle of San Jacinto, on April 21, 1836, ending the revolution and giving Texas its independence.


The chapel that is now so recognizable as the Alamo was built around 1744 as part of mission San Antonio de Valero, found in 1718 by the Franciscans. During that time, some of today's Alamo Plaza was used as a cemetery. Between the bodies originally interred there, and the bodies from the Alamo battle that were buried, construction workers in today's world sometimes dig up human bones when they are excavating in the area. Perhaps this, combined with the horrific battle and massacre that occurred there, can help explain the ghostly activity that has been reported on the site for many years.


One of the most popular ghost stories of the Alamo concerns a little boy who is seen peering from an upper window down into the courtyard in front of the gift shop shown above... which is a little strange, since that building wasn't added to the plaza until 1936. Even stranger, to look out of the window, a person would have to climb up on something to perch there at the window. Some credit the legendary tale that a young lad escaped the mission before the battle began, and he returns to the place where he last saw his loved ones alive.


A woman is also reported to have been seen next to the water well shown above. Appearing only at night, reports allege that she materializes only as a vaporous torso-like spirit. No one knows who this restless apparition might have been, or why she seems to be intent on fetching water from the well.


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